Creating a Healthy Biological System,

Your grandfather knew this all a long!

Beneficial Microbes

are     microscopic     organisms     such     as bacteria   and   fungi   that   exists   in   our   soil that: decompose residues store and cycle nutrients in the soil build organic matter build soil structure work in tandem with the roots of plants to hold nutrients in the soil and then release them when needed stimulate hormones fix nitrogen and solubilize phosphates they compete with disease organisms for food and space, or consume them, or induce systematic resistance to disease in plants
1

Improves the Life of the Soil

Compost and compost tea bacteria break down organics into plant available nutrients. Some bacteria convert nitrogen from the air into a plant available nutrient; Compost and compost tea enriched soil have lots of organisms that burrow through the soil keeping it well aerated; Compost and compost tea increases may suppress diseases and harmful pests that could overrun poor, lifeless soil; Healthy soil is an important factor in protecting our waters; Compost and compost tea increases soil's ability to retain water and decreases runoff. Runoff pollutes water by carrying soil, fertilizers and pesticides to nearby streams; Compost and compost tea encourages healthy root systems, which also decrease runoff; Compost and compost tea can reduce or eliminate the use of synthetic fertilizers; Compost and compost tea can reduce chemical pesticides since it contains beneficial micro- organisms that may protect plants from diseases and pests; Only a 5% increase in organic material quadruples soils water holding capacity.

Optimal Soil Structure

Optimal soil is full of tiny air channels and pores that hold air, moisture and nutrients. Helps sandy soil retain water and nutrients; Helps bind clusters of soil particles, called aggregates; Compost loosens tightly bound particles in clay or silt, so roots can spread, water drain and air penetrates; By altering soil structure, making it less likely to erode, and prevents soil splattering on plants - spreading disease; Compost can hold nutrients tight enough to prevent them from washing out, but loose enough so plants can absorb them as needed; Compost makes soil easier to work with.
Biology   will   determine   soil   quality.   It   is   therefore   important   to   understand   our   biological   friends   under   our   feet.   We   are   referring   to   the   microscopic organisms,   called   Microbes.   There   are   an   enormously   wide   range   of   microbes,   that   can   exist   in   our   soil,   for   example,   Fungi,   nematodes,   protozoa, nematodes, etc. that must be present in order to have healthy soil. Selecting and Replenishing Beneficial Organisms Compost   and   Compost   Tea   contain   high   levels   of   beneficial   organisms   that   your   soil   requires.   But   it   is important   to   first   understand   what   type   of   beneficial   microbes   your   soil   or   crop   requires   by   conducting some biological testing. At   Northridge   Farms,   we   can   provide   you   with   a   variety   of   high   quality   organic   based   compost   and compost    tea    that    you    as    a    grower    or    manager    need,    to    create    a    favourable    environment    for beneficial organisms to thrive. Many   of   today's   conventional   soil   management   practices   deplete   our   soil   of   nutrients   and   beneficial microbial   life,   affecting   the   biological   process   or   our   soil   and   creating   imbalances   that   invite   disease, insects and cause environmental problems such as ground water pollution and erosion.
Put back what You take out

FACTS

2
3
Soil Ecology and Productivity: An    immense    diversity    of    microbes    inhabit    soil.    These    microbes consist   of   bacteria,   fungi,   algae,   protozoa,   nematodes   and   other micro-invertebrates.    The    majority    of    microbes    help    to    create    a balanced    and    robust    environment    for    plant    growth    (productive soil).   Productive   soils   require   less   nutrient   and   pesticide   additions and   most   importantly,   less   water   than   conventionally   maintained soil.

Bacteria:

Tens   of   thousands   of   species   of   bacteria   inhabit   just   one-gram   of productive    soil.    Bacteria    are    vital    to    the    productivity    of    healthy soils.   They   aid   in   nutrient   cycling,   soil   building,   degrading   organic residues,    disease    suppression    and    are    food    sources    for    other microbes.

Fungi:

Perhaps     the     least     understood     and     most     under     appreciated members   of   the   soil   community.   There   are   thousands   of   species   in one    gram    of    productive    soil.    Fungi    are    extremely    important    in binding    and    releasing    P-complexes,    Ca-complexes    and    creating stable/arable   soil   aggregates.   They   are   the   "superhighways"   of   the soil.

Protozoa:

The   mineralizers.   Protozoa   consume   large   numbers   of   bacteria   and other   microbes   releasing   many   vital   nutrients   via   excretion   into   the surrounding   soil.   One   ciliate   can   consume   30   bacteria   per   hour   and only require 1/6 of the total nitrogen mineralized.

Nematodes:

The    most    numerous    animal    on    the    planet    and    perhaps    the    most poorly    understood.    Most    nematodes    are    beneficial    -    feeding    on bacteria,   fungi   and   other   soil   microbes.   Some   are   pathogenic   -   feeding on   plant   roots   (hence   the   bad   reputation).   Healthy   soils   contain   only   a few root feeding nematodes. Micro-arthropods::    Shredders    and    grinders    mobilize    organic    matter into    forms    more    usable    by    other    microbes.    Micro-arthropods    are extremely    important    in    nutrient    cycling,    disease    prevention    and maintaining a healthy productive soil. Keys to Maintaining Productive Soils: Addition of humified organic matter (compost, green manure) Reduction in chemical applications (nutrients and pesticides) Inoculating plants and soil with beneficial microbes Education   -   working   to   further   understand   how   biology   works chemistry   in   plant   growing   systems   to   optimize   productivity   and sustainability
ADDRESS PO Box 272 Aylesford Nova Scotia B0P1C0 LOCATION 2546 Hwy 221 Aylesford  Nova Scotia B0P1C0 LINK TO GOOGLE MAPS
CONTACT Robin Horsnell info@northridgefarms.ca Dwight Horsnell  Dwight@northridgefarms.ca Office: 902 847 0494 Fax: 902 847 0983
FACILITY HOURS Monday - Friday 8.00 am - 5.00 pm During the months May & June Open on Saturday 9.00 am - 12.00 noon
It is  just not possible to rate Compost Tea or Compost in terms of NPK.   The   traditional   NPK   rating   system   describes   the   solubility   of   a   synthetic fertilizer.   Synthetic   nutrients   are   readily   available   to   the   plant   roots   for absorption.   However,   the   plant   might   not   be   in   a   need   for   that   particular nutrient   as   the   time.   As   synthetic   nutrients   do   not   remain   in   the   soil   very long,   they   might   not   be   available   when   needed   due   to   heavy   watering   or rainfall.

What is the NPK rate

Nitrogen,

Phosphorous,

Potassium

for Compost or Compost Tea?

Biology    will    determine    soil    quality.    It    is    therefore important   to   understand   our   biological   friends   under our     feet.     We     are     referring     to     the     microscopic organisms,   called   Microbes.   There   are   an   enormously wide   range   of   microbes,   that   can   exist   in   our   soil,   for example,   Fungi,   nematodes,   protozoa,   nematodes,   etc. that must be present in order to have healthy soil. Selecting and Replenishing Beneficial Organisms Compost    and    Compost    Tea    contain    high    levels    of beneficial   organisms   that   your   soil   requires.   But   it   is important   to   first   understand   what   type   of   beneficial microbes    your    soil    or    crop    requires    by    conducting some biological testing. At    Northridge    Farms,    we    can    provide    you    with    a variety    of    high    quality    organic    based    compost    and compost   tea   that   you   as   a   grower   or   manager   need,   to create     a     favourable     environment     for     beneficial organisms to thrive. Many     of     today's     conventional     soil     management practices   deplete   our   soil   of   nutrients   and   beneficial microbial   life,   affecting   the   biological   process   or   our soil     and     creating     imbalances     that     invite     disease, insects    and    cause    environmental    problems    such    as ground water pollution and erosion.

What is the NPK rate

Nitrogen,

Phosphorous,

Potassium

for Compost or Compost Tea?

1
3
2

Creating a Healthy Biological

System,

Your grandfather knew this all a long!

FACTS

It   is      just   not   possible   to   rate   Compost   Tea   or   Compost in terms of NPK.   The     traditional     NPK     rating     system     describes     the solubility    of    a    synthetic    fertilizer.    Synthetic    nutrients are   readily   available   to   the   plant   roots   for   absorption. However,   the   plant   might   not   be   in   a   need   for   that particular   nutrient   as   the   time.   As   synthetic   nutrients do   not   remain   in   the   soil   very   long,   they   might   not   be available    when    needed    due    to    heavy    watering    or rainfall.
Put back what You take out
ADDRESS PO Box 272 Aylesford Nova Scotia B0P1C0 LOCATION 2546 Hwy 221 Aylesford  Nova Scotia B0P1C0 LINK TO GOOGLE MAPS
CONTACT Robin Horsnell info@northridgefarms.ca Dwight Horsnell  Dwight@northridgefarms.ca Office: 902 847 0494 Fax: 902 847 0983
FACILITY HOURS Monday - Friday 8.00 am - 5.00 pm
During the months May & June Open on Saturday 9.00 am - 12.00 noon
Soil Ecology and Productivity: An   immense   diversity   of   microbes   inhabit   soil.   These microbes    consist    of    bacteria,    fungi,    algae,    protozoa, nematodes      and      other      micro-invertebrates.      The majority   of   microbes   help   to   create   a   balanced   and robust   environment   for   plant   growth   (productive   soil). Productive    soils    require    less    nutrient    and    pesticide additions     and     most     importantly,     less     water     than conventionally maintained soil.

Bacteria:

Tens   of   thousands   of   species   of   bacteria   inhabit   just one-gram   of   productive   soil.   Bacteria   are   vital   to   the productivity    of    healthy    soils.    They    aid    in    nutrient cycling,     soil     building,     degrading     organic     residues, disease   suppression   and   are   food   sources   for   other microbes.

Fungi:

Perhaps     the     least     understood     and     most     under appreciated   members   of   the   soil   community.   There   are thousands   of   species   in   one   gram   of   productive   soil. Fungi   are   extremely   important   in   binding   and   releasing P-complexes,   Ca-complexes   and   creating   stable/arable soil   aggregates.   They   are   the   "superhighways"   of   the soil.

Protozoa:

The   mineralizers.   Protozoa   consume   large   numbers   of bacteria    and    other    microbes    releasing    many    vital nutrients   via   excretion   into   the   surrounding   soil.   One ciliate    can    consume    30    bacteria    per    hour    and    only require 1/6 of the total nitrogen mineralized.

Nematodes:

The   most   numerous   animal   on   the   planet   and   perhaps the    most    poorly    understood.    Most    nematodes    are beneficial   -   feeding   on   bacteria,   fungi   and   other   soil microbes.    Some    are    pathogenic    -    feeding    on    plant roots   (hence   the   bad   reputation).   Healthy   soils   contain only a few root feeding nematodes. Micro-arthropods::    Shredders    and    grinders    mobilize organic    matter    into    forms    more    usable    by    other microbes.    Micro-arthropods    are    extremely    important in   nutrient   cycling,   disease   prevention   and   maintaining a healthy productive soil. Keys to Maintaining Productive Soils: Addition    of    humified    organic    matter    (compost, green manure) Reduction   in   chemical   applications   (nutrients   and pesticides) Inoculating     plants     and     soil     with     beneficial microbes Education   -   working   to   further   understand   how biology      works      chemistry      in      plant      growing systems        to        optimize        productivity        and sustainability

Creating a Healthy Biological System,

Your grandfather knew this all a long!

Beneficial Microbes

are     microscopic     organisms     such     as bacteria   and   fungi   that   exists   in   our   soil that: decompose residues store and cycle nutrients in the soil build organic matter build soil structure work in tandem with the roots of plants to hold nutrients in the soil and then release them when needed stimulate hormones fix nitrogen and solubilize phosphates they compete with disease organisms for food and space, or consume them, or induce systematic resistance to disease in plants
1

Improves the Life of the Soil

Compost and compost tea bacteria break down organics into plant available nutrients. Some bacteria convert nitrogen from the air into a plant available nutrient; Compost and compost tea enriched soil have lots of organisms that burrow through the soil keeping it well aerated; Compost and compost tea increases may suppress diseases and harmful pests that could overrun poor, lifeless soil; Healthy soil is an important factor in protecting our waters; Compost and compost tea increases soil's ability to retain water and decreases runoff. Runoff pollutes water by carrying soil, fertilizers and pesticides to nearby streams; Compost and compost tea encourages healthy root systems, which also decrease runoff; Compost and compost tea can reduce or eliminate the use of synthetic fertilizers; Compost and compost tea can reduce chemical pesticides since it contains beneficial micro- organisms that may protect plants from diseases and pests; Only a 5% increase in organic material quadruples soils water holding capacity.

Optimal Soil Structure

Optimal soil is full of tiny air channels and pores that hold air, moisture and nutrients. Helps sandy soil retain water and nutrients; Helps bind clusters of soil particles, called aggregates; Compost loosens tightly bound particles in clay or silt, so roots can spread, water drain and air penetrates; By altering soil structure, making it less likely to erode, and prevents soil splattering on plants - spreading disease; Compost can hold nutrients tight enough to prevent them from washing out, but loose enough so plants can absorb them as needed; Compost makes soil easier to work with.
Biology   will   determine   soil   quality.   It   is   therefore   important   to   understand   our   biological   friends under   our   feet.   We   are   referring   to   the   microscopic   organisms,   called   Microbes.   There   are   an enormously   wide   range   of   microbes,   that   can   exist   in   our   soil,   for   example,   Fungi,   nematodes, protozoa, nematodes, etc. that must be present in order to have healthy soil. Selecting and Replenishing Beneficial Organisms Compost   and   Compost   Tea   contain   high   levels   of   beneficial   organisms   that   your   soil   requires. But   it   is   important   to   first   understand   what   type   of   beneficial   microbes   your   soil   or   crop   requires by conducting some biological testing. At   Northridge   Farms,   we   can   provide   you   with   a   variety   of   high   quality   organic   based   compost and   compost   tea   that   you   as   a   grower   or   manager   need,   to   create   a   favourable   environment   for beneficial organisms to thrive. Many      of      today's      conventional      soil management   practices   deplete   our   soil   of nutrients         and         beneficial microbial       life,       affecting       the biological   process   or   our soil   and   creating   imbalances that      invite      disease, insects          and          cause   problems        such        as ground           water pollution                  and erosion.
Put back what You take out

FACTS

2
3
Soil Ecology and Productivity: An   immense   diversity   of   microbes   inhabit   soil.   These   microbes   consist   of   bacteria,   fungi, algae,   protozoa,   nematodes   and   other   micro-invertebrates.   The   majority   of   microbes   help   to create   a   balanced   and   robust   environment   for   plant   growth   (productive   soil).   Productive   soils require    less    nutrient    and    pesticide    additions    and    most    importantly,    less    water    than conventionally maintained soil.

Bacteria:

Tens   of   thousands   of   species   of   bacteria   inhabit   just   one-gram   of   productive   soil.   Bacteria   are vital   to   the   productivity   of   healthy   soils.   They   aid   in   nutrient   cycling,   soil   building,   degrading organic residues, disease suppression and are food sources for other microbes.

Fungi:

Perhaps   the   least   understood   and   most   under   appreciated   members   of   the   soil   community. There   are   thousands   of   species   in   one   gram   of   productive   soil.   Fungi   are   extremely   important in     binding     and     releasing     P-complexes,     Ca-complexes     and     creating     stable/arable     soil aggregates. They are the "superhighways" of the soil.

Protozoa:

The   mineralizers.   Protozoa   consume   large   numbers   of   bacteria   and   other   microbes   releasing many   vital   nutrients   via   excretion   into   the   surrounding   soil.   One   ciliate   can   consume   30 bacteria per hour and only require 1/6 of the total nitrogen mineralized.

Nematodes:

The   most   numerous   animal   on   the   planet   and   perhaps   the   most   poorly   understood.   Most nematodes    are    beneficial    -    feeding    on    bacteria,    fungi    and    other    soil    microbes.    Some    are pathogenic   -   feeding   on   plant   roots   (hence   the   bad   reputation).   Healthy   soils   contain   only   a   few root feeding nematodes. Micro-arthropods::   Shredders   and   grinders   mobilize   organic   matter   into   forms   more   usable   by other    microbes.    Micro-arthropods    are    extremely    important    in    nutrient    cycling,    disease prevention and maintaining a healthy productive soil. Keys to Maintaining Productive Soils: Addition of humified organic matter (compost, green manure) Reduction in chemical applications (nutrients and pesticides) Inoculating plants and soil with beneficial microbes Education   -   working   to   further   understand   how   biology   works   chemistry   in   plant   growing systems to optimize productivity and sustainability
ADDRESS PO Box 272 Aylesford Nova Scotia B0P1C0 LOCATION 2546 Hwy 221 Aylesford  Nova Scotia B0P1C0 LINK TO GOOGLE MAPS
CONTACT Robin Horsnell info@northridgefarms.ca Dwight Horsnell  Dwight@northridgefarms.ca Office: 902 847 0494 Fax: 902 847 0983
FACILITY HOURS Monday - Friday 8.00 am - 5.00 pm During the months May & June Open on Saturday 9.00 am - 12.00 noon
It   is      just   not   possible   to   rate   Compost   Tea   or Compost in terms of NPK.   The   traditional   NPK   rating   system   describes the   solubility   of   a   synthetic   fertilizer.   Synthetic nutrients    are    readily    available    to    the    plant roots     for     absorption.     However,     the     plant might    not    be    in    a    need    for    that    particular nutrient   as   the   time.   As   synthetic   nutrients   do not   remain   in   the   soil   very   long,   they   might not   be   available   when   needed   due   to   heavy watering or rainfall.

What is the NPK rate

Nitrogen,

Phosphorous,

Potassium

for Compost or Compost Tea?